What Permits Do I Need to Fish in Alaska?

When visiting Doc Warner’s Fishing Lodge, there are a few things you should understand about fishing licenses. Due to Alaska’s popularity as a fishing destination, the state puts necessary regulations on permits and licenses that pertain to both residents and non-residents. 

Fishing in Alaska is regulated by the Alaska Department of Fish & Game (ADF&G). All residents between the ages of 16 and 60 – as well as non-residents over the age of 16 – need a fishing license. If you plan on fishing for King Salmon, you will need to purchase a King Salmon stamp in addition to your license.

Alaska issues four types of fishing licenses: Sport, Personal Use, Subsistence and Commercial. Only Alaskan residents may qualify for a personal use or subsistence license. Additionally, each region of the state has its own restrictions. Doc Warner’s is located in the Southeast Region of Alaska and falls within the jurisdiction of the Juneau-Glacier Bay Management Area.

Catching a Fish at Doc Warner's Lodge in Alaska

However, you do not need to worry about these regulations or buy a license prior to your visit. The staff at Doc Warner’s is trained to understand the fishing regulations and will assist you in obtaining the correct license. The price is included with your stay.  All fishermen over the age of 16 need to provide a drivers license or military ID.

Please do not risk spoiling your trip by fishing without the proper license and stamp on your person at all times. Several Alaska agencies have enforcement power and guests of Doc Warner’s are checked on a regular basis. If you are caught fishing without the correct license, you will be fined immediately and charged between $100 and $150.

Below is a summary of the basic state, federal and regional requirements for Alaskan sport fishing. Due to the fact that catch limits, size restrictions, and bait or lure regulations are determined by species and body of water being fished, please refer to pp. 20-21 of the ADF&G website for further detail.

Alaska Fish and Game Logo
Non-Resident Sport Fishing in the Juneau-Glacier Bay Management Area

            Price and Type:

Fishing License

King Stamp

1 Day

$20

$10

3 Day

$35

$20

7 Day

$55

$30

14 Day

$80

$50

Annual

$145

$100

Resident Sport Fishing in the Juneau-Glacier Bay Management Area

            Price and Type:

Annual Fishing License: $24.00                 Annual King Stamp: $10

Misc Information

Resident adults over 60 must obtain a free ADF&G Permanent Identification Card.

No one under 16 needs a license.

Both children under 16 and resident holders of the ADF&G ID card must obtain a free Harvest Record Card and record any sport fish caught subject to limit restrictions.

Children under 16 are bound by the same size and limit restrictions as adults.

 

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Mark Warner
Mark H. Warner was raised in Juneau and he has been fishing the waters of Alaska for more than 30 years. He grew up working with his father developing Doc Warner’s from its earliest days. After getting his Ph.D. in Mechanical engineering, he went to work in the industry where he later completed an Executive MBA. Then in 2010, his father, Doc, offered Mark and his wife, Kristina, the opportunity to move back to Alaska and operate the lodge full-time. Today, Mark has over 25 years of experience with Doc Warner’s. His knowledge and experience teaching people about self-guided fishing in Alaska are now used to create lasting memories for Doc Warner’s guests.
Posted in Licenses and Permits
2 comments on “What Permits Do I Need to Fish in Alaska?
  1. Harry Antonson says:

    I moved up to Alaska from Florida last year. I am in a Alaskan native. How do I obtain a subsistence salmon fishing license.
    Thank You,
    Harry

    • Mark Warner Mark Warner says:

      I suggest checking with fish and game. Our understanding is that subsistence permits are only available to residents who do not reside in Anchorage, Fairbanks, or Juneau. Also, please note that Alaska has very strict rules on how long someone must reside in state before they are eligible for resident status. If you moved to Alaska last year, you most likely will not be considered a resident until January of 2018.

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